Use List.ly for Interactive, Collaborative Book Lists!

Here’s a recent library school assignment: Try out a social media tool, one you’ve never used before. Make a Prezi with a voice over to explain how the tool works and its potential use in a library setting.

Cool! I thought. There are tons of social media tools I don’t know much about.

A Short List of Web 2.0 Tools I’d Like to Learn

  1. Voxer
  2. Snapchat
  3. Diigo
  4. Tumblr
  5. Flickr
  6. Vine
  7. Eas.ly
  8. And 50 more I’ve never even heard of!

I wanted a tool we hadn’t talked about in class yet. My friend, teacher librarian Amy Woods (@msawoods), told me about List.ly. Guess what List.ly is for? Yep, making lists. The Internet thrives on lists: The Top 5 Reads of 2016, 10 Great Movies to Watch Before You Die, 13 Reasons to Drink Milk. You know what I mean. List.ly facilitates the process and opens the genre to collaboration, interaction, and sharing.

You can check out my first list through the Twitter post at the top of this blog or by clicking here. I am especially proud of the cute Lego guys in the header–that image is CC0 Public Domain via Pixabay. Love it! In fact, that is one great feature of List.ly. Each list is completely your own.

The possibilities for use in schools are endless. Leave aside the issue of free vs. pro accounts and whether you need to moderate student comments. Consider what you could do.

5 Ideas for Using List.ly in the School Library

  1. Have students make lists of their top 5 books of the year or by genre or by subject.
  2. Start a book list yourself and ask students to add their own favorites.
  3. Make a list of sources for class inquiry projects.
  4. Have collaborative groups post their research sources by topic.
  5. Make lists of fun school events like dress-up days or images from the school play.

Do you see what I mean about lists? Everyone loves a list. For some reason, a list feels manageable and fun. Here’s an added bonus: When students annotate their images or videos, not only are they practicing important writing skills, they are also writing for authentic audiences. That’s a double win.

If you want to know more about List.ly, check out my Prezi on the topic. If you make your own list, tag me @amyjmcmillan. I think List.ly has a lot of potential for engaging student learning and promoting creativity. What else can we come up with?

Screen Shot 2016-07-06 at 4.18.05 PM

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